Controversial Art, Part 4: TL;DR

This is part of a series about controversial art that pulls from an academic paper I wrote. Marketing theory suggests that if we are able to prove a benefit will be provided to the consumer as a result of viewing controversial material, consumers are more likely to take the content in. Researchers, educators, artists, journalists,…

Controversial Art, Part 3: How-to

This is part of a series of posts talking about how the law interacts with tattoo art and what happens when other art gets involved. I’m still not a lawyer. The short answer: don’t focus on the controversy itself, or the PR it generates; focus on the benefits of working with the subject and the…

Controversial Art, Part 2: “Art must be allowed to provoke”

This is part of a series about controversial art that pulls from an academic paper I wrote. There was an intro paragraph to this section, but I can’t imagine leading this section with anything but this story: One of my favorite parts of this paper is the example of Afro-Swedish sculptor Makode Linde. Linde is…

Controversial Art, Part 1

Because of the recent press about Trumbull High School’s cancellation and uncancellation, and possibly copyright violation (Howard Sherman covers it beautifully here and in a few other posts prior to that one), there’s been a bit of chatter around arts admin social media regarding the production of controversial art. It feels like a good time to…