Selective Context: the Passive Approach to Researching Provenance, Part 2 – ‘Wally’ on the Road – The Prime Example of the Leopold Problem

There was no shortage of demand for Schiele, whose works were considered acceptable by Nazi standards. “In 1995/1996, Rudolf Leopold exhibited 152 personally selected works by [Egon] Schiele in Tubingen, Dusseldorf, and Hamburg. Additional stops in 1997 included Graz, New York, and Barcelona,” Dobrzynski writes. The most famous of the controversial works shown in this…

ABSTRACT – Your Mission, if You Choose to Accept it: Evaluating Planning as a Preventative Approach to Nonprofit Mission Creep in a Visual Arts Context

Mission creep, or deviation from an organization’s stated mission, is a problem that affects nonprofit visual arts organizations at the most basic level. However, the sensitive nature of mission misalignment means that it is difficult to conduct research on the causes of mission creep. Anecdotal evidence suggests that organizational planning that focuses on an organization’s…

I read the Corcoran judicial ruling so you don’t have to

…unless you want to, or think I’m an unreliable source of information, which would not be unreasonable given my lack of law degree. I wrote this shit direct from the court documents (here) without googling anything. I am as stunned as you are. Why am I doing this to myself? This ruling made me rethink a…

Controversial Art, Part 4: TL;DR

This is part of a series about controversial art that pulls from an academic paper I wrote. Marketing theory suggests that if we are able to prove a benefit will be provided to the consumer as a result of viewing controversial material, consumers are more likely to take the content in. Researchers, educators, artists, journalists,…

Controversial Art, Part 3: How-to

This is part of a series of posts talking about how the law interacts with tattoo art and what happens when other art gets involved. I’m still not a lawyer. The short answer: don’t focus on the controversy itself, or the PR it generates; focus on the benefits of working with the subject and the…

Controversial Art, Part 2: “Art must be allowed to provoke”

This is part of a series about controversial art that pulls from an academic paper I wrote. There was an intro paragraph to this section, but I can’t imagine leading this section with anything but this story: One of my favorite parts of this paper is the example of Afro-Swedish sculptor Makode Linde. Linde is…

Controversial Art, Part 1

Because of the recent press about Trumbull High School’s cancellation and uncancellation, and possibly copyright violation (Howard Sherman covers it beautifully here and in a few other posts prior to that one), there’s been a bit of chatter around arts admin social media regarding the production of controversial art. It feels like a good time to…